Inspiring a generation

Connect To Your Future

You could be part of some of the biggest infrastructure projects in the UK, helping to keep our 64.6 million-strong population moving or shaping the future of travel. A world of opportunities is ahead of you in the transport sector.

Your journey starts here.

Where will your journey take you? Discover the possibilities.

Which path will you take? Explore opportunities.

Discover Opportunities

There are more roles within the transport sector than you might think – in fact, you can have almost any type of career you want within the transport industry!

Take a look through some of them in your own time, or use our tool to see which roles you might be suited to... you might be surprised which roles you are a match for...

Pick out your favourite subjects and choose the phrases that describe you best to discover which jobs in transport could be your perfect fit:

What subjects are you interested in?
  • Architecture
  • Art
  • Business Studies
  • Communication Studies
  • Design & Technology
  • Economics & Finance
  • Electronics and Computing (ICT)
  • Engineering
  • English
  • Geography
  • Law
  • Maths
  • Media Studies
  • Sciences
  • Politics
  • Sociology
  • Statistics
What type of person are you?
Inspire me Or Explore all careers

Our Partnership

Transport for London (TfL), along with our partners below, have come together to provide a single voice for the entire transport industry to engage, motivate and inspire the next generation to consider a career in transport. Click on any of the logos below to find out more about career pathways within each company. Each role featured has a number of different routes in – apprenticeships, graduate schemes, work experience, internships – so explore what each company offers and get involved.

We hope you enjoy the films, explore the toolkit and feel inspired to be part of the transport industry in the future.

Ashurst is a global law firm with a history spanning almost 200 years, providing their services to local and global corporates, financial institutions and governments on all areas of commercial law.

BDB is a multi-disciplinary UK law firm advising private companies, public sector bodies, not-for-profit organisations and individuals since 1834. BDB is committed to creating an environment for all members of its staff which is free from any form of discrimination and which celebrates and values diversity.

Cubic Transportation Systems is a leading integrator of payment and information technology and services for intelligent travel solutions worldwide. Cubic provide innovative technology and an integrated approach to systems and services for government and commercial customers around the globe.

Go-Ahead is one of the UK's leading public transport providers. Since it was founded in the 1980s, Go-Ahead has grown from a small bus operator in north-east England to an organisation providing more than a billion journeys each year on our UK bus and rail services.

Novacroft develops, implements and manages smartcard technology and software solutions. They help clients get more for less and make life easier for all. By 2018, Novacroft will have impacted the community by reducing the number of people needing hospital beds by 100,000, and will have helped 50,000 more people into education and employment.

Siemens is a global engineering and technology services company who have been active in the United Kingdom for over 170 years. Siemens focuses on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalisation.

The Tower Transit operation in London is a part of the Tower Transit Group. Established in 2013, the Group currently employs 2,030 staff and operates 650 buses, with 1,700 staff and 450 buses operating within the TfL London operation.

The London Highways Alliance (LoHAC) is a joint initiative between TfL and London's boroughs, created to provide a valued street environment for people who live in, work in and visit London. Work under the LoHAC contract is divided between four area-based joint highways contractors, namely, Conway AECOM (a joint venture between FM Conways and AECOM), Ringway Jacobs, CVU (a joint venture between Colas, Volker Highways and URS) and Kier Group.

FM Conway is one of the UK's leading infrastructure services companies.

AECOM is a global provider of professional technical and management support services.

CVU is a Joint Venture (JV) between Colas, VolkerHighways and URS that has forged together the complementary strengths of three companies. We have a history and pedigree renowned for excellence in highways operation, highways maintenance and highways improvement around the world and the UK, particularly in London.

Kier Group plc is a leading property, residential, construction and services group which invests in, builds, maintains and renews the places where we work, live and play. We operate across a range of sectors including defence, education, housing, industrials, power, transport and utilities.

We are Ringway Jacobs, a leading highways service provider working with local authorities across the UK.

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Ana Sanchez
Senior Quantity Surveyor
Conway AECOM
Ana has recently joined Conway AECOM as a Senior Quantity Surveyor.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Challenging, diverse and fast-paced.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

It varies – I can be attending design or progress meetings, looking at new proposed schemes or assessing applications. I work closely with clients, subcontractors and all other departments involved in any project. I get to speak to people from lots of other teams to exchange views and knowledge. I enjoy the variety of the projects I get involved with, getting out and about and seeing things happen.

What do you love about your role?

There is always huge satisfaction seeing the final result of a project and how much an area has benefited from the hard work invested. It is great to be part of delivering projects in the transport industry – safe infrastructure in good condition has a huge impact in every aspect of our lives.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

I completed a BSc (Hons) degree at University of Reading in Construction Management and Engineering, specialising in Quantity Surveying and Construction Management. Before that, I completed an International Baccalaureate which focused on science and technology.

What are the main skills and personality traits you need to perform your role?

You need to enjoy meeting people from all walks of life. You must have attention to detail and be able to retain and juggle numerous facts and information.

Where will your role take you?

My short-term goal is to become an asset to the team I recently joined. In the long term, I want to continue to develop my knowledge and gain valuable experience at a more senior level.

Are there any misconceptions about your role and how would you correct these misconceptions?

Many people think that the construction industry is dominated by males, but the industry is changing! There are more and more women involved at all levels and the industry has so many opportunities.

How many people work in your team and what are your different responsibilities?

There are around 20 people in our team. We have various roles, but we all have an input on projects and manage our own projects. It is a real team effort and we acknowledge that everyone is key to the successful delivery of any project.

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Charlotte Hall
Contact Centre Adviser
Novacroft
Charlotte is a Contact Centre Adviser for Novacroft.

What do you do?

I assist customers with day-to-day queries about TfL Oyster photocards. I have many duties, including resolving queries, processing refunds and replacing cards.

Do you have to deal with a lot of complaints?

I don't just deal with complaints. People think you're just on the phone all day, yet this is not the case. There’s a lot of variety in my role.

How do you deal with difficult problems?

I use a combination of common sense, analytical thinking and a number of written resources.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Character-building, demanding and rewarding.

How big is your department?

I am office-based. My team consists of 95 people. Together we provide a high standard of customer service. I work closely with our Customer Experience department.

Why do you enjoy your job?

I enjoy knowing that the customer is satisfied with the service they receive from me. Sometimes I’m asked to assist new starters. This allows me to pass on the knowledge I’ve learnt during my time here. I’m proud of this because it makes me happy knowing that I'm valued and that my colleagues have faith in me.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

High standards are needed in customer service. You need high attention to detail, empathy, and the ability to communicate with anyone.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

I was always interested in the customer service side of things, which is what attracted me to my current position. In the future I would like to progress to become a Team Leader or Manager in my department.

What does it take to do your job well?

Being able to adapt to different situations with different callers. Being patient and a good listener.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Research the careers you’re interested in. If you doubt that this is something that you want to do, don’t rush into things. I would suggest volunteering in a similar job role to be 100% sure.

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Clare Brint
Senior Asset Engineer
Network Rail
Clare works for Network Rail as a Senior Asset Engineer.

What do you do?

I identify where landslides might happen, carry out work to prevent these landslides and fix them when they do happen. I carry this out through a programme of examinations, maintenance, refurbishment and renewals work.

What was your route into the transport industry?

Whilst I was studying for my Engineering Geology Master of Science, I worked with a company who at the time was doing the earthworks examinations in Scotland for Railtrack (Network Rail’s predecessor), who I then began a permanent job with. I have been examining, designing, repairing and now managing railway earthworks for 16 years and I still love it.

Why do you like working in transport?

I love working on the railway; the history is fascinating and there is always more to learn. The people working in the industry are fiercely proud of the work they do and are always happy to share their knowledge which is a pleasure to be around. I also enjoy being able to help in getting people to the places they need to be.

Why would you recommend your role to young people?

It can be fun, challenging, welcoming and above all, useful. For my role in particular I’ve had the opportunity to build things in various and often interesting places.

What achievement are you most proud of?

There was a landslide near Berwick and the East Coast Mainline was shut due to an embankment washout following some torrential rainstorms. We worked quickly to allow the safe re-opening of the railway and ensured that the train companies and their passengers were well informed. I was very happy to have been part of a team who had worked flat out to get the railway re-opened for those passengers.

What would your advice be to someone interested in your role?

Go for it, take all the opportunities offered, keep asking questions and listen to the answers.

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David Yorke
New Technology, Training and Projects Manager
Tower Transit Operations Ltd
David is a Future Vehicle Technology Manager for Tower Transit Operations Ltd.

What do you do?

I project manage new technology vehicles, particularly hydrogen fuel cell buses, for the London bus fleet. I work closely with Transport for London and deal with issues from European partners. I also have to write reports, do research and attend meetings about making plans for the future.

Why do you enjoy working in the transport industry?

It’s challenging and rewarding. The most enjoyable part of the job is meeting people and understanding new technologies. Travelling and meeting people is a major part of the role. You can travel to many countries.

What does your working environment look like?

My work is office-based but I have to meet a lot of people both inside the company (in all departments) and outside the company. I am part of a small engineering team but mainly work on my own. As I work with ‘green technologies’ I have to keep up-to-date with the latest developments.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

The ability to converse with all levels of workforce, plus good English and maths skills. My role is always evolving, so you should embrace change. As a Project Manager you have to stay organised and never fall behind on work. You need good planning and foresight.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

I’ve always enjoyed and been fascinated by engineering; both historical and modern. At school I wanted to be a professional cyclist. I have two Master of Science degrees in engineering subjects. Transport is at the cutting edge of engineering technology, which led me to working in this industry.

Myth Busting: Engineers

Engineers do not fix washing machines! Engineering is the art of ideas while understanding what is possible. You don’t necessarily get dirty being an engineer.

What advice would you give to young people interested in your role?

Success is built on hard work. Work hard and believe in yourself!

What’s your favourite type of transport and why?

Bicycle; freedom.

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Debs Towers
Contact Centre Team Leader
Siemens
Debs works in Siemen’s Contact Centre which is part of the Service Operations Centre. Debs leads a team of operators who manage faults that are reported across the UK on traffic-related equipment such as traffic lights.

What do you do?

Our team looks after over 110 different contracts. After receiving a report of a fault, our job is to pass out each fault to our trained engineers within minutes of receiving it. As a Team Leader I ensure my team are motivated, that targets are met and that I’m always up-to-date with the latest contract changes.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Varied, challenging, busy.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

My role varies. One day I can be attending customer meetings and the next helping out on the fault desk. I spend a large part of my day answering emails from customers, contract managers and other departments. I also update processes, organise the system, make arrangements for new contracts and look after recruitment for the department.

Do you spend a lot of time on the phone?

Very little of my time is spent on the phone. I think people often have the wrong idea as to what working in a contact centre entails. In fact only a small percentage of our work is on the phone and it’s very reactive. As the Team Leader I deal with complaints but only on the odd occasion.

Why do you enjoy your job?

I like that my job is so varied, there is always something new and challenging. The traffic industry is a lot bigger than I ever thought with lots of different departments all doing different jobs and tasks, working towards the same goal.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

Organisation, multi-tasking, attention to detail and the ability to keep a cool head.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

I wanted to be in the police when I was at school. I originally started as Contact Centre Analyst and worked my way up to Team Leader. When I applied for the Contact Centre Operator role I needed good GCSEs and experience in a customer service environment.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

What you think you want to do at school doesn’t necessarily have to be what you want to do in the long term. If you can volunteer with companies then that’s a good way to get a better idea of what a job is really like.

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Emily Davenport-Braes
Project Manager
Go-Ahead
Emily is a Project Manager at Go-Ahead, where she manages projects between Southeastern and Network Rail.

What do you do?

I manage a number of projects across the different services my company provides. I am responsible for the planning and execution of specific projects.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

My role involves managing a number of different projects which can all be at various stages. So no one day is the same. I work as part of the Major Programmes team which is a fairly small team. We manage projects between Southeastern and Network Rail. Recent projects include working with Thameslink, Crossrail and East Kent Resignalling Phase 2.

How do you manage large complex projects?

The best way is to spend time at the start making thorough plans. The better prepared you are at the start of a project, the less time you’ll have to spend solving problems further down the line.

What makes a great Project Manager?

You need to be a good communicator, a strong leader, have excellent organisational skills, be able to make decisions and thrive under pressure. You have to be able to create a sense of teamwork with a mix of different people. But most importantly, a great project manager should be enthusiastic in everything they do. If you don’t care then why should anyone else in your project?

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

I love that no two days are the same and that each project brings its own challenges.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

I studied Law at university but once I had graduated I realised that it wasn’t the right career for me. So I did some contract work in different fields to try and find a role that I loved.

Why did you choose to work in the transport industry?

I knew a few people who were already working in the railway industry and said how much they loved it. When I saw an opportunity to apply to Go-Ahead, I went for it and I haven’t looked back since!

What did you want to do when you were at school?

I was constantly changing my mind about what I wanted to do when I was at school. I went from wanting to be an actor to wanting to be a lawyer in the space of a year!

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Follow something that you really care and feel passionately about. If you plan to do something for the rest of your life, it should be something that makes you excited to get out of bed each morning.

What is the most important lesson you have learnt in your role?

That there is so much more to public transport than moving passengers from A to B. It’s an incredibly complex world that’s completely different to anything else out there. But it is truly fascinating and an amazing place to work.

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Fiona Lampard
Assembly Engagement Manager
Government Relations – TfL
Fiona works as an Assembly Engagement Manager for TfL which is responsible for running and regulating London’s transport system.

What do you do?

I help maintain Transport for London’s good reputation with members of the public, our customers and politicians. I do this by helping to answer questions asked by London Assembly Members and Members of Parliament about TfL and the transport network. I also make sure the Mayor of London and the TfL Commissioner have the information they need at meetings.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Interesting, challenging, inspiring.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Answering questions from politicians by email, letter or phone; researching and writing briefings (or information reports) for senior managers at TfL; and writing answers to questions that Assembly Members ask the Mayor.

Are there any misconceptions about your role?

Some people might think that the aim of a government relations role is to keep embarrassing information hidden from public view and to present only the positive side of the story to make an organisation look its best. This is absolutely not the case. We also work to uphold TfL’s strong commitment to being an open and transparent organisation and to keep members of the public and politicians informed.

Why do you enjoy your job?

I enjoy learning about all of the interesting and exciting projects TfL is working on. I also really like the people I work with; we help and support each other at the busy times. There are so many different kinds of job opportunities in the transport industry and so many interesting and dedicated people working towards a common goal.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

You need to be a good communicator, both in writing and when speaking with people. You also need to be a good listener so you can understand someone else’s position and empathise with them. It also helps if you’re friendly, helpful and have a ‘can do’ attitude.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

From about age 12 through to university, I wanted to be a journalist for a newspaper or music magazine. I previously worked for the Australian government in various policy and communications jobs. When I moved to London, I applied for my job at TfL knowing very little about the transport industry, but knowing that TfL was a well-respected and interesting organisation.

What advice would you give to young people who are interested in your role?

Keep informed about politics at a local and national level. Learn about how decisions are made at your local council level right through to the central government. Understanding the political environment, and the different political players and their motivations, is also very important. Think about the forms of communication that you find most effective or impactful and why.

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Godfrey Junior
Assistant Operating Manager
Go-Ahead
Godfrey is an Assistant Operating Manager for Go-Ahead London.

What do you do?

I provide strong visible leadership for the garage, our drivers and the services we provide. I manage our financial principles and motivate staff. I make sure that there is a high level of communication between our staff, the public, London Buses, local residents and other organisations. Since the start of 2016 over 31 million members of the public have travelled on our buses!

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Exciting, challenging and inspiring.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Every day is different! Usually I start by reviewing my to-do list and checking my emails. Then I meet with the other managers to discuss strategy for the day ahead. Then I start interviewing drivers and discussing topics with them. I email performance updates to all staff. I also speak to the finance department and type up minutes from meetings.

How do you make sure that you are providing your team with everything that they need?

By being proactive, visible and approachable.

Why do you enjoy your role?

The diversity of people from all walks of life that I work with. Knowing that I am helping various members of the public across the whole of London travel to see loved ones and friends. I chose to work in the transport industry because it’s dynamic and always changing.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

Excellent communication skills, resilience, motivation, ambition, excellent leadership and people skills, adaptability, strategic thinking and attention to detail.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

After GSCEs and A levels I went to university to study Human Resources. I stayed on and was President and Vice President of the Students’ Union. Then I applied for the graduate programme at Go-Ahead. I would like to progress in my career to become an Operating Manager and, in the long term, Transport Leader.

What did you want to do when you were at school?

I wanted to become a Police Officer.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Do as much research as possible. Never say no to anything. Ask many questions and seek advice. Gain work experience in as many industries as possible.

What is the most important lesson you have learnt in your role?

There has been a lot to learn. Always have a plan.

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Hannah Self
General Manager
Go-Ahead London
Hannah is a General Manager for Go-Ahead London, the largest bus operator in London who provide services on behalf of TfL.

What do you do?

As General Manager, I am responsible for my garages running a safe, reliable, customer-friendly and cost-effective bus service. I manage 700 drivers, 60 passenger assistants, 5 managers and 15 supervisors/administrators.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

People, challenges, customers.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Every day is different. There are always various meetings to lead and action plans to follow. I make sure that my teams are performing to the best of their ability. Stockwell Garage is one of the biggest bus garages in London. We operate 19 day/night routes, which keep London moving.

What other departments do you work closely with?

The operating team works closely with Engineering, Accident Prevention and Service Quality.

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

I enjoy the fact that every day is different, and that I work with so many interesting people.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

I studied Sociology and Economics at university. You are required to have a good standard of English and maths. After university I started a business graduate scheme.

Did you have any interests that led to your role in the transport industry?

I had work experience at London Underground which assisted my career path.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

You need patience, to have good communication skills and to be able to make decisions.

What’s been your proudest moment at Go-Ahead?

I was Project Manager for Go-Ahead during the Olympics. It’s definitely a time I will always remember.

What advice would you give to young people who are interested in your role?

The transport industry is great. You will have your eyes opened and have a lot of fun. At the same time you’ll be challenged and have to put in a lot of effort.

What did you want to do when you were at school?

A zookeeper.

Do you have work social activities?

There is a Sports and Social Club that you can join, and you can go on trips with co-workers; go bowling, fishing. There are usually groups for everything!

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Jess Gurney
Management Accountant
Siemens Mobility
Jess works in Siemen’s Traffic Solutions team.

What do you do?

I support the operations and engineering departments in Siemens Traffic, creating monthly management reports and carrying out financial analysis. My main task since starting in this role has been focused on a project that has seen production moving from a factory in Germany to the UK.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Varied, innovative and challenging.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

At the start of the month I am busy ensuring that all costs are booked to the correct areas, as well as producing reports for management looking at our performance for the month. The rest of the month I will be looking at improving reports as well as assisting the factory with any requests they may have.

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

I enjoy the area of finance I am in as I am able to get a better understanding of the products we produce and sell, so I can see how we make money. I was surprised by the fact that my role was not entirely number-based (although around 70% of it is); I get to see all aspects of the business.

Do you have to be good at maths to become an accountant?

I think people often see accountants as having to be good at maths and being constant number crunchers. While to some extent you do need to have solid numeracy skills, my job is not purely focused on this. Accountants are often dealing with hands-on issues such as stock levels or the purchase of new machines.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

Nothing specific, but business and maths are an advantage. I was part of the Young Enterprise scheme, setting up a business through school, so I found the idea of a financial role interesting.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

Being approachable, able to listen and able to explain. You also need to be highly organised.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

I joined Siemens as an apprentice on the Siemens Finance and Commercial Academy following the completion of my A levels. I was keen to start a career and was put off university due to the costs. I was one of the youngest students to become a chartered accountant, at the age of 21.

Why did you choose to work in the transport industry?

When looking for my permanent role, my placements within Traffic Solutions and Rail Automation provided me with varied and interesting work. I was able to play a part in something that people use every day, so I felt like I was having more of an impact.

Would you recommend doing an apprenticeship?

Although university is a good choice, don’t write off apprenticeships. They give you a way of getting straight into working and learning as you go. This gives you the ability to earn money as well as to gain vital experience ahead of graduates of the same age.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

If you are not sure about what career you are after keep an open mind and don’t panic. I found asking local companies for work experience helped me to decide. Once you have found something that interests you, research the ways of getting into that area.

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Jo Phelps
Head of Human Resources
Novacroft
Jo is the Head of Human Resources at Novacroft.

What is Human Resources?

Human Resources is about making things happen through the people that work within your business. Different areas of HR include recruitment, employee relations, reward, and communications.

What do you do?

I support the business by shaping and delivering our people strategy. My aim is to find the right people to deliver the best possible service to our transport clients. I lead a team of 3 HR advisors and look after our reception team. We have over 50 years of experience between us!

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Exciting, endless possibilities.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

I do lots of different things. I recruit for new talent and that includes spotting talent in our existing team. I also write policies and guidelines for our teams. HR can be seen as either custodians of tea and sympathy, or the other end of the spectrum! We add value to the teams by providing the right processes and guidance. Not taking ourselves too seriously helps as well!

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

Seeing people succeed and grow.

What are the main skills/personality traits you need to perform your role?

Communication skills, influencing skills and leadership. Being open to new ideas, having empathy and drive!

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

When I was at school I wanted to be a dancer. After my A levels I went straight into work. I then studied a postgraduate diploma with the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD). This qualification enabled me to apply for my role.

Why did you choose to work in the transport industry?

The ability to influence and make a difference.

What has been your proudest moment at work?

Growing our team from 40 when I joined to a team of 200 now! That's a lot of interviews!

What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your role?

Seize any opportunity to learn, put your head above the parapet!

What has been the most surprising aspect of your role?

No two people are ever the same and you should never assume they are!

Do you have any social activities at work?

Charity events, the ‘Rock Solid Race’, bake-offs... the list is endless.

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Jonathan Morrow
Transport Modeller
TfL
Jonathan works in the Road Space Management (RSM) team within TfL.

What do you do?

I build and use computer models that represent or simulate real-life road networks and conditions. I use them to test different road options – for example, adding a new bridge across the Thames or removing a lane on a road and predicting what will happen.

How does your work fit into the wider transport industry?

Ultimately my work helps London’s traffic move better with less congestion. The decisions that we make and what we do has a direct effect on everybody who uses those roads. I am project manager for a new model we’re building that covers all of London. It has over 17,000 junctions and 1,000 roundabouts!

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Changing, interesting, challenging.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Usually 3-4 hours of modelling work, an hour of meetings with members of my team to discuss and delegate jobs, an hour of meetings with clients to discuss what they would like tested in the model or what outputs they would like to see and an hour of work-related ‘housekeeping’ such as interviewing. Oh yes, and at least two cups of tea.

What has been the most interesting project you have worked on?

It has to be the Olympic Games in London in 2012. It was an extremely high-profile project with lots of media coverage and press. My proudest moment was when, after working on the project for about 12 months, the Olympic Games began and there were no significant transport problems.

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

Being able to provide key information that will help determine the outcome of some very important schemes. Also the TfL cake policy where it is customary to bring in cake on your birthday to share.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

Most transport modellers have a degree in civil engineering, maths or geography. The subjects I studied at school which have been most useful to me were maths, English and geography.

What was your path from school to your current role?

At school I went through a few phases of wanting to do different things. One time I wanted to be chef and I also remember wanting to be a lumberjack! I studied a degree in Transport and Business. Then I took a Master of Science in Transport Engineering and Operations.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

Having good numerical skills, being able to learn new modelling software packages quickly and being computer literate. Having good communication and people skills is very important. It’s also important to be interested and careful about the small details.

What advice would you give young people when thinking about what career to pursue?

Find out what you’re good at and interested in. But be realistic and be prepared to work hard. Nothing is given to you on a plate.

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Karen Concannon
Civil Engineer
AECOM
Karen is a Civil Engineer with Conway AECOM, who support TfL and other councils to provide solutions to their transport needs.

What do you do?

I work for AECOM, as a Design Engineer. I design infrastructure for pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles. I work in a large team of 20 people. I am currently working on Cycle Superhighways in London. It’s a project that I’ll be able to look at whilst walking through London in years to come and one that I’m proud to have played a part in.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Busy, exciting, worthwhile.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

I usually start my day at my computer, working on designs. Clients give us an idea of what they want to achieve. We turn this idea into something that can be built. I may have to go onsite to do investigation work for my design during the day. I also work in road safety, reviewing schemes from the viewpoint of all users.

What do you enjoy about your role?

I’m always working on something different. Transport is a fast-paced industry to be in, with new challenges always coming in. As a civil engineer, I want to have a positive impact on the built environment around me and this role has allowed me to do that. It’s exciting that we have many new people joining our industry, as graduates and apprentice trainees.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

In school, I studied the sciences and maths. I studied a degree in Civil Engineering, then a master’s in Transport in London. I’ve always had an interest in what was around me and how it got there. I love history and would always have to look up where something came from or how it developed into what it is now!

What skills do you need to perform your role?

A desire to improve what is around you. Some days are hectic, busy, crazy, but there is a satisfaction in being able to see what you’ve designed being used by someone in their journey.

What advice would you give young people when thinking about what career to pursue?

Ask lots of questions. You’re surrounded by people who will have an insight into careers that you did not know existed. You could ask parents, their friends, or older siblings of friends. If it sounds interesting to you, ask if you could spend a day with them. I did some work experience with a civil engineering firm when I was 16 and I really enjoyed it.

What’s your favourite type of transport and why?

Walking! I am a big lover of walking through the city as I find it’s a great way to get to know places.

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Krishna Desai
Marketing Executive
Cubic Transport Systems
Krishna is a Marketing Executive for Cubic Transportation Systems, who invented the Oyster card for TfL.

What do you do?

I coordinate all marketing activities within the company. I work with internal and external people and agencies to make sure that all queries are dealt with effectively.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Exciting, innovative and important.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Every day is different. I could be preparing for a trade show or helping to write press releases. I also meet with our media agency to discuss future marketing campaigns. Sometimes I work with the brand manager to create adverts for publications. Projects can be as short as a day or as long as 3 months.

What’s it like working in marketing?

Some people think marketing is just about making things look nice. But there is a lot more to it. You really need to understand your products, your company and your industry well. It’s about how customers and people see your brand. Strong branding allows you to leave a lasting impression, and helps to sell more products. It also helps you recruit the best people.

What does your working environment look like?

Usually I am based in an office. Sometimes I go out to meet customers or agencies. I also get to travel a lot when going to international trade shows. I love the fact that I get to travel and see new places.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

I studied a Business and Management degree, specialising in marketing. At school I wanted to be a chef and own my own dessert bar.

Did you have any interests or hobbies as a student that influenced your career path?

I used to write for the business newsletter at school. I realised how much business affects everything around us. I knew I wanted to study it further but there are a lot of different business areas you can work in and I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do. After studying a bit of everything, I discovered that my strengths are in marketing.

What are the main skills and personality traits you need to perform your role?

You need to be organised, able to multi-task and to pay attention to detail. You also need to have persistence, creativity and to be able to speak to lots of different people. Networking is key.

Why did you choose to work in the transport industry?

Transport is a thriving business. There is a lot going on and a lot to learn. I want to become more involved within the transport industry and become a public speaker. I want to really understand the industry and work with partners to get people to places smarter, quicker and easier.

What advice would you give to young people who are interested in marketing?

Always be willing to learn, speak to people, go to events and say yes to new responsibilities that come your way. The more you understand, the more you can contribute.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Finding out what you want to do for the rest of your life is daunting and for most people there is no certainty. Once you choose a path you are not stuck with it. Don’t be afraid to try different things. Do something you are good at, something that builds on your strengths or something you are passionate about.

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Laura Abbatangelo
Station Manager
Go-Ahead
Laura is a Station Manager at Go-Ahead.

What do you do?

I am a Station Manager at London Bridge for Go-Ahead. I look after Southern station staff, customers and stakeholders (different operating companies) at London Bridge. I work with 4 other managers, and together we look after the station team. Our aim is to run a good service so that people can get to their destinations on time.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Rewarding, challenging, varied.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Each day is different, that is what makes it interesting. However, safety is always at the heart of each task; it’s very important to make sure that customers have a safe journey.

What does your working environment look like?

It is mix of working in an office and on the platforms.

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

I enjoy the variety in my day-to-day job, knowing that each day will raise different challenges. I also enjoy working alongside several departments such as Training and Development, Safety and Customer Service.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

You need to have a passion for customer service. You have to be a good communicator, and have good time management skills. You also need to be able to empathise, understand frustrations and remain calm under pressure.

Why did you choose to work in the transport industry?

Because I am passionate about customer service and the transport industry shares the same passion.

What has surprised you since starting your job?

The opportunities available to make changes.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

No career is too silly if it fulfils you.

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Maria Agorastoudi
Traffic Signals Engineer
Traffic Infrastructure - Asset Management Directorate/Transport for London
Maria works for TfL as a Traffic Signals Engineer.

What do you do?

I’m responsible for designing changes to traffic signal junctions and pedestrian crossings across London. Once the changes are designed, I need to issue the works out to one of our contractors and then project-manage the construction of the scheme. It means I get to see changes happen to the road network right through from initial planning to completion, which is very satisfying.

Who do you work for?

Quite simply, anybody who wants to change the layout of a junction or pedestrian crossing in London. This could range from a developer who is looking to change the road layout to improve access to their new shopping centre, to making junction efficiency improvements for our colleagues within TfL who operate the network.

What has been the most interesting project you have worked on?

I am currently working on a scheme to introduce a new junction which will allow buses to turn right instead of going all the way through a roundabout. This will introduce more efficiency in journey times through a congested area and will allow more space on the network.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Stimulating, collaborative, rewarding.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

One of the best things about working in the transport industry is that each day varies. For example one day you can be outside the office conducting an assessment onsite, and the next liaising with different people regarding the status of a scheme. I also continually communicate with the contractors to ensure the best results.

Why do you enjoy your job?

People think that my role is solely in the design and construction of a project, when in fact it gives you the opportunity to meet all sorts of different people and to try to implement their needs. Since working within the transport industry I have learnt that every decision made affects someone’s everyday life.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

Good organisation and ability to plan ahead are two key elements to have in my role. You also have to be a people person, so communication skills are very important.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

My bachelor’s degree is in Civil Engineering. I followed that with a master’s degree in Civil Engineering Structures and a second master’s degree in Environmental Systems Engineering. It was the combination of traffic-focused modules that drew my attention to the transport industry.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Follow any road that meets your aspirations no matter the challenges. Doing something you really love and are passionate about allows you to excel and become valuable in your profession.

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Nicoleta Ciobanu
Bus Driver
Tower Transit Operations Ltd
Nicoleta is a Bus Driver for Tower Transit Operations Ltd.

What do you do?

I drive buses on the 328 route around London. There are around 400 drivers based at my garage, and 1,500 drivers in the company. As a driver I make sure that people can get around London safely. We are a skilled workforce that work hard for our qualifications. We make sure that people travel around our amazing city safely.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Fun, enjoyable and varied.

What was it like starting your job?

I was surprised how big the vehicle was. I was nervous so I drove very slowly! You do spend a lot of time working on your own but I don’t mind that as when I get back to the garage there is always someone to talk to.

What other departments do you work closely with?

The garage-based operations team, and the engineering team if there are issues with my bus.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

The PCV driving test – theory and practical. Not many people know that we have ongoing training to keep our qualification to drive. With constant improvements in technology, vehicles and buses are getting easier to drive.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

The ability to drive safely with patience and understanding. A smile and polite manners go a long way with customers.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

At school I wanted to be a singer. I came to the UK from Romania and worked in retail. Ever since I got my licence I’ve enjoyed driving, so I applied to be a bus driver. I really enjoy my role. Maybe in the future I would like to progress to working in a supervisory role.

Do you have any funny work-related stories?

Once, a lady got on my bus and asked me to follow the bus in front because she had lost some property that was on it.

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Paul Gatenby
Software Development Manager
Cubic Transport Systems
Paul is a Software Development Manager for Cubic Transportation Systems, who invented the Oyster card for TfL.

What do you do?

I manage a team of around 20 software engineers, and there are roughly 60 people in my department. With careful planning we contribute to the overall success of the transport network.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Most days are varied. I check the status of our work, plan ongoing and new work and support the team.

What are your main goals?

To manage my team well and deliver good quality software on time and within budget.

Which other departments do you work closely with?

System Engineering and System Testing.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

Software Engineering.

What are the main skills and personality traits you need to perform your role?

Logical thinking and people management.

What did you want to do when you were at school?

I wanted to become a professional cyclist.

Do you have any advice for young people?

Get good grades at university, it will help open the doors to this industry.

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Priti Patil
Business Analyst
Novacroft
Priti is a Business Analyst for Novacroft.

What do you do?

I am the bridge between the client (Transport for London) and my team at Novacroft. I make sure that everyone understands and appreciates what others are working on and going through as part of the work. I’m constantly in touch with all departments and keep everyone updated. It’s a really interesting role that comes with its own flavour of patience and perseverance!

How would you describe working in the transport industry?

It’s an interesting place to be, with lots to do. You’re always in touch with reality.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Interacting with people, discussions on multiple ideas, reading and replying to emails, defining plans, designing features, looking at the statistics. We create solutions that are designed to make life easier for people.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

For this role, I was expected to understand business analysis techniques. But when I started I knew that the technical understanding of how software works is more useful. My interests as a student were more about engineering drawing – I loved isometric views and machine drawings. I think this carried over into my current role, where simplifying a process with pictures helps – a picture speaks more than words.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

Being approachable, being a person who can listen to people, being a person who can help simplify detail and being someone who can provide a bird’s-eye view.

Why did you choose to work in the transport industry?

It is interesting and it directly relates to real day-to-day life. If we are striving to make things better for all of us, we have to take clues from our own lives. And I think this close linking of the transport industry with real life is very interesting.

What advice would you give young people when thinking about what career to pursue?

Go with what your heart wants, the activity that makes you most happy is the activity that will build your career.

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Rachael Chapple
Associate Lawyer
Ashurst LLP
Rachael works as a Lawyer with Ashurst LLP.

What do you do?

I am an Associate Lawyer in the transport team at Ashurst, which advises on the legal aspects of major transport and infrastructure projects both in the UK and globally. The team is large and has representatives in a number of Ashurst offices across the globe. It consists of lawyers of varying seniority, from partner to trainee solicitor. I am one of the associates within that team.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Challenging, varied, relevant.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

I am involved in the drafting and negotiation of the contracts which are key to ensuring that a transport/infrastructure project can go ahead. As part of my work I often interact with funders, technical advisors and subcontractors.

Why do you enjoy your job?

The work is extremely varied. In addition, it is nice to be able to physically see the outcome of a project you have been working on, such as when the relevant infrastructure is built. This is something that you don't get in many other areas of the legal profession.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

To become a lawyer it is necessary to have completed either (i) a law degree and the Legal Practice Course; or (ii) any other degree, the Graduate Diploma in Law and the Legal Practice Course.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

Dedication, attention to detail, organisation and logical thinking.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

I completed an LLB (undergraduate honours degree) in Law followed by an LLM (postgraduate master’s degree) in International Economic Law. I then completed the Legal Practice Course and began a training contract with Ashurst. I chose to work in the transport industry because the work is varied and allows me to develop skills in a large number of areas.

Is your role changing with the times, e.g. with changes in technology?

Yes, the legal profession is constantly evolving and the role of the lawyer is constantly required to adapt to changing client needs.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Pursue a career you enjoy and are interested in.

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Salma Jawaid
Revenue Protection Inspector (RPI)
TfL
Salma works as a Revenue Protection Inspector (RPI) for TfL in their Enforcement on Street Directorate.

What do you do?

Most of my shift is spent outdoors on the bus network rather than in an office. We are given different locations every week and have to make sure that certain areas and routes are covered. My main role is to detect and deter fare evasion. However, I also provide customer service information to customers and assist them with their journeys.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Varied, exciting, challenging.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

First I meet up with my partner and then we go to our set location for that day. There, we check passenger tickets and passes and deal with any other issues which we may come across.

What other departments do you work closely with?

London Buses, London Underground and Centrecomm (Transport for London's emergency control room for London Buses).

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

I enjoy my role as no two days are ever the same and I get to meet and speak to lots of different people every day.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

English, maths and information studies.

What are the main skills you need to do your job?

Being able to think on your feet, patience, diplomacy and good people skills.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

At school I wanted to be a journalist. After I left school, I was busy raising a family. Once my children were older, I spent over 13 years working for the NHS and then 10 years at Barking and Dagenham Council. These roles were all very customer-focused and I gained lots of experience in dealing with distressed and upset customers.

Why did you choose to work in the transport industry?

I had heard that TfL is a great company to work for and there are lots of opportunities for development and career progression. In the future I would like to progress into working in Centrecomm or to become a coach/trainer within TfL.

Can you tell us a work story?

Working in this industry I’ve learnt to expect the unexpected. One day my colleague and I came across an elderly gentleman asleep on a bus. After speaking to him we found out that he should have been in hospital. He was quite upset but we managed to calm him down and we arranged the help he needed. He thanked us for taking the time to listen and for our help.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Follow your dreams; the sky is your limit!

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Sam Abbott
London Streets Traffic Control Centre Traffic Coordinator
Transport for London
Sam is a London Streets Traffic Control Centre Traffic Coordinator within Road Space Management (RSM) at TfL.

What do you do?

I monitor and manage traffic flows to help keep London moving. I work in the London Streets Traffic Control Centre (LSTCC). We deal with congestion, incidents and accidents on the transport network and liaise with various contractors or the police to solve these issues.

How much do you use technology in your role?

People think that computers control traffic signals all of the time. But these can be manually overridden depending on what is happening on the road network. We use a lot of different systems so technology plays a big part in how well we can do our job.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Every day is different.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

First, we take a handover from nightshift of any issues with works, accidents or incidents that are ongoing. We are each assigned an area of London to monitor each day. I check the status of all the traffic signals in my monitoring area. We deal with any incidents that happen on the TfL network in that area that may cause congestion.

What did your training for this role include?

We have a 6-week training course to get to grips with the systems and processes we use. We also have site visits to certain areas to understand traffic flows, signal timings etc.

What does your working environment look like?

We work in an open-plan office with the bus and police teams. This allows a smooth exchange of information between each department. We also work closely with Centrecomm (Transport for London's emergency control room for London Buses) who can be very helpful in providing eyes on the ground, especially where we have limited CCTV coverage.

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

The variety, the effect we have on managing London’s traffic, and seeing the results.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

Good judgement, logical thought process and common sense. Timing is everything. We work in a real-time environment so it’s really important that we do everything within a tight time-frame.

Which school subjects relate to your role?

Geography and maths.

Can you tell us about your career path from school to your current role?

At school I wanted to be an air hostess. I worked in the travel industry and completed a degree in Business Management. I started working as a Training Administrator in the LSTCC but thought that I wouldn’t be able to pass the assessment to become a Traffic Coordinator. But I saw an opportunity and went for it, and I am very happy I made the transition.

What’s been your proudest moment at work?

When I first started my role as a Traffic Coordinator, I entered information into the system about an accident that I was dealing with. I realised that what I had written was being read out word-for-word by the news presenter on the BBC. It was a very proud moment.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Read about the jobs we have. Look at the graduate schemes TfL offer. Start thinking about what you want to do early. This will help you to identify what you want to do later in life.

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Samantha Stanbridge
Assistant Engineer
AECOM
Samantha is an Assistant Engineer with Conway AECOM.

What do you do?

My job is to design a range of traffic and highway engineering schemes. These can be for junction and corridor (e.g. a road or highway) improvements through to large neighbourhood safety schemes.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Inventive, rewarding, inspiring.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

A typical day would involve developing solutions for engineering projects using Computer Aided Design. This includes designing schemes to help improve neighbourhood areas and safety.

What does your working environment look like?

I work in an office with different teams, such as Building Engineering, Transport Planning and Environment.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

I achieved the required grades in both maths and English. I am currently studying for a BTEC Level 3 Diploma in Civil Engineering.

Did you always want to be an engineer?

No, I had not previously thought of a career in engineering. When I first joined AECOM I was a receptionist. Then I became an administrator. I was offered the opportunity to join the apprentice scheme. Since then I have developed my skills to fulfil my current role as an Assistant Engineer.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

The main skills I require to perform my role are problem solving and excellent communication skills. I have to be both logical and practical with all the projects I work on.

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Sarah Clark
Legal Director
Bircham Dyson Bell LLP
Sarah is an infrastructure planning lawyer at Bircham Dyson Bell LLP.

What does your job involve?

My role is to help deliver new transport projects, mainly railways. I work as part of a wider team of engineers, planners, environmentalists and surveyors. We secure legal consent for a particular scheme, so that it can become a reality. This includes preparing designs, looking at how the scheme impacts the environment and submitting applications. We then deal with any objections or opposition to the proposals.

How long have you been in transport?

I have been working in the transport sector for over 10 years. I started in 2005 having qualified as a planning solicitor in Scotland.

How did you get into the transport industry?

After my training I worked on a private bill to re-open a former railway between Glasgow and Edinburgh. I found the work fascinating and enjoyed working as part of a wider team with the same goal. Then I moved to London and secured a role at a law firm which specialised in this type of legal work – and I haven’t looked back since!

What do you like about working in transport?

It is not until you work in transport that you begin to realise how important it is to everyone. Good transport connectivity can transform whole communities and people’s lives. It is inspiring to me that our work can help bring about these benefits.

What are you most proud of?

I am currently part of the team advising TfL on its plans for Crossrail 2. This is one of the biggest new transport projects in the country and it is very exciting to be part of it.

What would your advice be to someone interested in your role?

Arrange a summer vacation placement within a law firm. This is a great way to gain first-hand experience of the work we do. You’ll learn more about the career path and make new contacts.

How should we encourage young people to pursue a career in transport?

It would be great to see the transport sector better promoted to students of all interests and backgrounds, so that they can understand the range of opportunities available. Although I spent 5 years at law school, I had no idea of the many varied and interesting roles for lawyers in transport.

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Shabana Anwar
Partner in the Government and Infrastructure Team
Bircham Dyson Bell LLP
Shabana is a Partner at Bircham Dyson Bell LLP.

What does your role involve?

My work involves either promoting or objecting to major projects on behalf of clients. One of the projects I am currently advising on is the proposed Garden Bridge. This is a new pedestrian crossing, which it is proposed will span the River Thames from Temple underground station to the South Bank.

Who do you work with?

Most of the projects that I work on are large and complex. I usually work as part of a large team of lawyers and other professionals including architects, ecologists, archaeologists, transport planners, engineers and environmental consultants. We help the client to prepare the documentation and the case for the project, and guide the application through the different stages from pre-application through to examination, consent and construction.

Why do you enjoy working in the transport sector?

It is an essential part of our lives and it affects everyone. Transport schemes are generally promoted to reduce existing problems such as congestion and delay. They also connect or open up new areas of development opportunity. It is very satisfying to be involved in transport schemes which you hope will make a positive difference to people’s lives.

What was your route to your role?

After completing a degree in History and English I realised that unless I wanted to teach or pursue a career in research, I needed to find an alternative career path. I had always been interested in the legal profession so I decided to become a solicitor. I qualified and began at the legal department of Camden Council, specialising in planning and highways law.

Why should young people consider working in the transport sector?

The transport sector is huge and covers a surprisingly wide range of skills and areas of study, including law. I have found working in the transport sector both interesting and incredibly rewarding.

Do you have any advice for young people?

I would encourage anyone interested in pursuing a legal career in this sector to identify the law firms specialising in major projects, including Bircham Dyson Bell. Read the information on their websites and contact them to learn more about the opportunities they offer.

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Sophie Achillini
Strategic Communications Manager
TfL
Sophie works in the Campaigns, Communications and Engagement team at TfL.

What do you do?

I look after our relationship with a range of groups that speak for our customers. That includes older and disabled people’s organisations, like Whizz-Kidz and AgeUK. We also work with parenting organisations like Mumsnet, and the joint sponsors of the Crossrail 1 project, such as the Department for Transport. I make sure that TfL’s reputation is maintained and enhanced.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Varied, challenging, exciting.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

There isn’t really a typical day. I work on key high-profile projects and campaigns. At the moment, I’m working on four separate campaigns to help disabled people and people who use buggies to travel. Elements of these campaigns include social media, video production, events management, presentations and copywriting.

How big is your team?

There are around 40 people in my wider team. We’re split into three sub-teams: Commercial, Business and my team, which works in the voluntary and community sector.

Which other departments do you work closely with?

Government Relations, Events and Publishing, the Press Office, Marketing, Social Media, Internal Communications and operational departments like Buses and London Underground.

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

Every day is different; I get to meet lots of people and I make life in London better for some of our customers.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

Studying communications-based subjects helped me apply successfully. I have a degree in English and a diploma in Public Relations. I also studied English, business and sociology at A level.

What are the main skills that you need to do your job well?

I need to be politically aware, persuasive, have excellent communications skills (both written and verbal), be diplomatic and be a good listener.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

At school I wanted to be an actress or a solicitor. I joined TfL’s customer services team as a temp (on a short-term contract) after graduating and I’ve gradually progressed to working in my current role. My future plans include working for a communications agency and to project-manage campaigns.

What’s it like working in the transport industry?

People think that if you work in transport you have to be an engineer or a train driver. There are lots of different communications-based roles available in transport. You can be a creative person and enjoy working in transport.

What advice would you give to young people who are interested in your job?

Look for opportunities to intern or do work experience placements with the charity or community sector, or in big organisations that have their own PR or Public Affairs teams. Take part in our Youth Participation Day or join our Youth Panel.

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Terry Van Poortvliet
Legal Partner
Ashurst LLP
Terry works as a Lawyer and is a Partner with Ashurst LLP.

What do you do?

I am a Partner in an international law firm, specialising in transport.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Exciting, varied and tangible.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Talking to clients about their issues and negotiating their position against other parties. I am an advisor and therefore I work for people all across the transport industry including governments, contractors, manufacturers and investors. We help clients to construct, operate and maintain the network and achieve their goals. For example I recently helped Crossrail buy their trains, for just over £1 billion.

Why do you enjoy your job?

It is extremely varied and the results are tangible; for example, roads are built and trains are manufactured.

What was your route from education to your role?

When I was at school I wanted to be a vet. After completing a different degree and then attending law school I applied to Ashurst and have been working here for the last 15 years. At the start of a legal career you work in 4 different areas and transport was the area I enjoyed the most.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

You need to be energetic, able to deal with multiple complex issues and able to work hard!

What has been the most surprising aspect of your role?

How much you need to know about the transport business! Virtually every piece of transport-related work reported in the press will have had lawyers working on it. The most important lesson that I have learnt whilst working in the transport industry is to always be prepared – you never know what is around the corner.

Are there any misconceptions about working in law?

Law is sometimes seen as a ‘male, pale and stale’ environment. This is an out-of-date notion, but we need your help to make sure that it becomes an industry that is more reflective of society.

Can you tell us about a project you have particularly enjoyed working on?

We worked on Edinburgh Tram which was in a difficult position with all the parties on the verge of litigation (taking legal action). We helped our client to negotiate a new deal with the parties which led to the project continuing and now being a great success.

What advice would you give to young people who are interested in a legal career?

Go for it! The work is interesting, fun and well paid!

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Look around and find something that interests you, because if you find it interesting you'll work harder and be better at it.

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Thai Pham
Commercial Manager
Tower Transit Operations Ltd
Thai works as a Commercial Manager for Tower Transit Operations Ltd.

What do you do?

I plan and coordinate all aspects of the TfL tendering activity. A tender is an offer to supply goods or services. My aim is to provide high-quality competitive prices for tenders. This provides the best value-for-money service for TfL and our passengers. I work with the finance department which is a team of 14 people.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Challenging but rewarding.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Research, analysis, planning and discussing. Around 40% of my work is dealing with numbers.

What do you enjoy about your job?

It’s never the same. We are a growing company. I enjoy opportunities to learn and experience new challenges.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

Accounting and finance.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

I need to be good at working under pressure and have organisation and communication skills.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

At school I wanted to be a footballer. I was unsure about what career path to pursue. After college I studied a Business Economics degree. I worked in Retail, Events and Conferencing whilst studying for a Chartered Institute of Management Accountants qualification. I ended up working in the transport industry after applying for a management accounting role.

Are there any misconceptions about your role and how would you correct these misconceptions?

A lot of people believe the industry is heavily male-dominated. But I’ve seen many women driving buses and in fact half of the office I work in is female.

What’s been your proudest moment at work?

I had dinner at the Houses of Parliament where the Senior Traffic Commissioner for the UK was present.

Do you have any career advice for young people?

Choose a career that you enjoy doing. Not everyone can be a footballer so you need to keep your options open. Work hard and focus on your studies.

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Tracey Smith
Transport Planner
Transport for London
Tracey works for the Mayor of London delivering his objectives for Transport Strategy in London.

What do you do?

I deliver schemes to make improvements to the TfL road network. It is my job to solve any issues people working on the scheme, involved in the scheme or affected by the scheme may have – this can mean engaging with colleagues, local residents, business owners, politicians or members of the local council. It’s a very active role as we are the only people who take the scheme from its starting idea to final delivery.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Evolving, imaginative, collaborative.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

I work closely with everyone involved in the scheme. I write letters to members of the public who have written to us asking about changes they would like to see in their local area. I also talk with our contractors about ongoing schemes and with designers about upcoming schemes. I work in an office but I also usually have a few site visits every week.

What is it that you enjoy about your job?

What I enjoy the most is seeing people using new facilities, like a new bench being sat on or a new pedestrian crossing being used; things that we take for granted every day, but can make so many people’s lives easier.

What are the main skills you need to perform your role?

You need to be a people person. You have to be organised and good at planning ahead.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

At school I wanted to be a recruitment consultant. I worked in a manufacturing company and worked my way up to being an Assistant Operations manager. I then applied for an Assistant Operations Manager role at TfL. I learnt a lot about the transport industry from the inside. I have now been here for 10 years working in the Highways Maintenance and Transport Planning teams.

What is the most important lesson you have learnt in your role?

Every decision I make affects someone!

Do you have team social activities?

We have regular team away days, where we have team brainstorming sessions. We recently had a Monopoly activity day. It was a fun day and we got to speak to people in our various teams that we generally don’t work with on a day-to-day basis.

Do you have enough time outside work for hobbies and other interests?

TfL is very big on ‘work-life balance’. We have a lot of social activities and groups within TfL ranging from football and yoga to Spanish lessons.

What advice would you give young people when thinking about what career to pursue?

Try and speak with someone who does the job already. Ask questions to see if you understand what it would be like to do that job. Transport for London is great for apprentice or graduate schemes, so have a look into the possibility of enrolling.

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Victoria Morley
Head of Press Desk
TfL
Victoria works for The TfL Press Office.

What do you do?

I talk to journalists and tell them what Transport for London is doing to help keep London moving. I also work very closely with other transport organisations including Network Rail and the Department for Transport. You don’t have to have been a journalist to work in the Press Office, but we have a key role in speaking to journalists.

How would you describe working in the transport industry in 3 words?

Fun, interesting, busy.

What does a typical day in your role involve?

Keeping an eye on the latest news headlines and how that can impact transport in London, and writing press releases telling people about our transport projects. I also speak to journalists who might have questions about transport in London. I sometimes attend media events – for example, to support the announcement of a new train service.

What does your working environment look like?

I’m mostly based in an office but sometimes get to go and see worksites, such as along the Crossrail route, or attend media events at stations. I also take some of our senior TfL people to radio or TV interviews at studios.

Which project have you worked on that has been the most fun?

I really enjoy working on Crossrail, especially now we are in the final stages before the railway opens. I recently got to attend an event with the Queen. She came to one of our Crossrail worksites to unveil the name of the new railway line: it will be called the Elizabeth line when it opens in a few years.

What is the typical length of any one project?

Sometimes we can be planning an event for a few weeks, but sometimes we only have a few hours to send out a response. I like the varied aspect of my role.

Which subjects did you have to study in order to apply for your job?

English – having good communications skills is key.

What are the main skills that you need to perform your role?

You need to be good at talking to people and finding out complex information. It’s important to know what the deadlines are and make sure you meet these. Sometimes deadlines can change as working in media is really fast-paced and a story can change quickly.

What was your route from school to working in the transport industry?

I went to university to study a Business Studies degree and from there went into communications jobs.

What advice would you give to young people who are in your role?

Work experience can be a great way to find out more about a role and to see if it’s the kind of thing you would like to do.